Introducing Internal Communication 3.0: Workforce Citizenship

The convergence of internal, external and social communication has been discussed a lot lately, but in this piece, “Internal Communication 3.0: Workforce Citizenship”, I’ve laid out a picture of what such a convergence could look like, described the turbulent social-media driven changes driving things in this direction, and identified some of the implications for internal communication and corporate communication as a whole.

At the core of this vision is an idea I’m calling “workforce citizenship”–a kind of engagement that reflects a renewed sense of two-way responsibility between staff and the organizations to which they belong, and by incorporating advocacy as well as productivity as part of that responsibility, consciously builds the workforce into an organization’s communication architecture.

The article was published originally on Ragan.Com, an industry-leading daily news-source dedicated to internal and external communication, and can now be found at Communitelligence at http://bit.ly/dyJ07v.

Will Social Media Drive Integrated Internal-External Comms?

In the first-ever “Thought Leaders” post on the site of CIPR Inside–the internal communications community within the UK’s Chartered Institute of Public Relations–I discuss some of the key attributes of social media likely to drive greater integration of internal and external communication in the coming year.

Key drivers I’ve identified include:

* timing–satisfying the desire for instant and efficient communications, and allowing key messages to be distributed with appropriate dispatch

* mapping–helping to identify meaningful internal communities and communities within the market, and within them, the people who influence others

* relevance–allowing employees greater flexibility in subscribing to communications that they wish to receive

* targeting–building on community mapping to provide alternative local sources of news and credibility to relieve pressure on line managers, who while a favored communication channel, are often overburdened and unreliable

The full post can be found at CIPR Inside: http://bit.ly/90Xv8u

Walls Come Down in final 2009 Article

Below you will find a link to an article I co-authored (with Kristen Sukalac of Prospero Communications [www.prospero.be] on the PR Conversations blogsite) on how the distinctions between traditional communications disciplines like public affairs, marketing, and internal communications have collapsed over the past year–and what the likely implications of that class will be for communication pros in the coming years.

The article can be found at:

http://www.prconversations.com/?p=645

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