About the Book: “Lincoln to LinkedIn: The 55 Minute Guide to Social Communication”

“From Lincoln to LinkedIn: The 55 Minute Guide to Social Communication” is a call to action , and in some respects, a call to arms.

Having worked in political campaigns before moving inside of large corporations, one thing I noticed was a dramatic shift in tone and approach – indeed a lack of respect for those people who were being asked to change, to innovate, to dig deeper and to represent their organisations with enthusiasm.

While the advent of social media has caused that condescension to reduce a bit, social evangelists also advocated replacing old-school, top-down, one-size-fits-all communication with the brainless anarchy of leaping headfirst into twitter and facebook without any thought about what lurks on the other side, or what lies beneath your own organisational surface.

Lincoln to LinkedIn offers an alternative.  It offers you an approach that is genuinely strategic, and one which encourages the intelligent use of new communication technologies without being a slave to them.  Indeed, one can run an effective social communication campaign with a phone, an email account and an excel spreadsheet.

In 108 pages, the book provides enough training and insights to allow you to do just that.

It also highlights concepts like social landscapes, tribal dynamics, and source credibility that rest at the core of effective, impactful communication, whether inside corporate walls, or inside broader – but still bounded – arenas of interest.

I invite you to order it, and above all, to let me know what you think.  I think you will agree that this approach could make a major difference, not only to you in achieving your objectives, but also in sharpening corporate communication while making it more respectful and impactful.

~~~

To order from Amazon.com, follow this link:

http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-LinkedIn-55-Minute-Social-Communication/dp/0956467229/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1302114959&sr=8-1

Those who wish to order from Amazon.co.uk can follow this link:

http://lnkd.in/37Uwv9

Advertisements

Now Published: Lincoln to LinkedIn – The 55 Minute Guide to Social Communication”

My new book, “Lincoln to LinkedIn – The 55 Minute Guide to Social Communication” is now available from Amazon.

The book has received a variety of strong reviews from leading lights in the communication and change arena. The following endorsement from internal communication legend Roger D’Aprix is particularly enthusiastic:

“We owe Mike Klein a debt of gratitude if for no other reason than his putting the social media evangelists in proper perspective. Aside from showing how their glib advice has created more than a few train wrecks, he exposes their penchant for glittering generalities and reckless recommendations that lead the innocents to possible professional disaster.

“Instead Mike offers the analytical tools to separate an ‘audience’ into its credible tribal parts and associated mutual interests. His book is the best thing I’ve seen on how to understand how real people communicate in real organizations.”

To order, follow this link:

http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-LinkedIn-55-Minute-Social-Communication/dp/0956467229/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1302114959&sr=8-1

For more information, or to read further endorsements, please visit the book’s blogsite at http://socialcommunication55.wordpress.com

“It’s Not Just About Social Media”–An Introduction to Social Communication

“It’s Not Just About Social Media–An Introduction to Social Communication” is a new presentation that outlines the core of my approach to communication strategy–to focus on the informal social groups and networks (tribes) in organizations and communities, alongside a focus on traditional channels, hierarchies and organization charts.

While social media can make these informal networks and tribes more visible and easier to influence and harness, I see it as a mistake to collapse the underlying theory and mechanics of a social communication strategy with the arrival or use of technology which may or not be acceptable within a given organization.

Indeed, the only software required to run an effective social communication program is an Excel spreadsheet–to identify key members in the community and the formal and informal groups to which they belong.

The only hardware required is a telephone–to allow for ongoing and regular communication with the key informal leaders within your area of responsibility.

Social Communications is grounded in timeless practice: it has a lineage dating back at least to 1840, when Abraham Lincoln articulated his “Lincoln Rules” for running successful political campaigns.

Social Communication approaches work well in internal communication situations–and particularly well in change programs which involve smaller core groups along with an extended network into the organization.

They also can be easily applied in external communication situations where the community of interest is well defined, for instance in a niche market or around regulatory or legislative issues.

The presentation can be found here: http://slidesha.re/cmSQEn.  If you would like to discuss with me, please email me at mklein818@yahoo.com

Introducing Internal Communication 3.0: Workforce Citizenship

The convergence of internal, external and social communication has been discussed a lot lately, but in this piece, “Internal Communication 3.0: Workforce Citizenship”, I’ve laid out a picture of what such a convergence could look like, described the turbulent social-media driven changes driving things in this direction, and identified some of the implications for internal communication and corporate communication as a whole.

At the core of this vision is an idea I’m calling “workforce citizenship”–a kind of engagement that reflects a renewed sense of two-way responsibility between staff and the organizations to which they belong, and by incorporating advocacy as well as productivity as part of that responsibility, consciously builds the workforce into an organization’s communication architecture.

The article was published originally on Ragan.Com, an industry-leading daily news-source dedicated to internal and external communication, and can now be found at Communitelligence at http://bit.ly/dyJ07v.